When a conventional washer-type faucet has to be excessively tightened down each time you shut it off in order to keep it from dripping, or when the faucet develops a drip that won’t stop no matter how hard you tighten it, then prompt repairs are advisable to keep things from getting worse – for example, […]

When a conventional washer-type faucet has to be excessively tightened down each time you shut it off in order to keep it from dripping, or when the faucet develops a drip that won’t stop no matter how hard you tighten it, then prompt repairs are advisable to keep things from getting worse – for example, to keep from damaging the faucet seat and possibly causing extensive damage to the faucet stem itself.

Most leaks can be repaired by taking the faucet apart and then installing a new washer at the end of the spindle, as well as replacing the packing or O-ring that goes around the outside of the stem in some cases. However, if you wait too long and keep trying to tighten the faucet down harder in order to stop the drip, then chances are that the valve seat will be damaged. The reason is that when you turn the handle on a washer-type faucet to shut off the flow of water the threaded spindle or stem screws its way down into the faucet body and presses the rubber washer on the end of the stem down against the metal valve seat inside the faucet body, thus closing the opening and shutting off the flow of water.

If this still doesn’t work then we advise calling the professionals here at Green Apple Plumbing & Mechanical. Call toll-free at 888-315-5564

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