Professional & Reliable Service

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New Installations and Replacements

Typical Installations Include:

  • Showers, bathtubs and toilets
  • Kitchen, bath and laundry sinks
  • Faucets and toilets
  • Water heaters, gas, electric, oil, solar
  • Tankless water heaters
  • Handicapped fixtures and accessories
  • Replacement of galvanized drain and water lines
  • Sump pumps
  • Garbage disposals
  • Bathroom remodeling
  • New homes
  • Additions
  • Well pumps
  • Replacement of cast-iron drains
  • Back-flow preventers
  • Outdoor spigots
  • Sewer, water and drain line repair and replacement
  • Water meters

Looking to update your bathroom to create an elegant bath retreat, tired of soaking up water in your basement and need a new sump pump installed, you've heard about tankless water heaters and want to learn more? We can help!

For years Green Apple Mechanical has been providing expert advice, design, and installations built to meet your needs. Our professional estimators take the time to listen to you and evaluate your home before providing a detailed proposal, often suggesting several alternatives that will deliver the comfort your family deserves while maximizing your budget.

We are committed to plumbing excellence in each and every job we perform.

Request Service Today!

Sewer/Drain Services

The sewer lines and drains in your New Jersey are essential components of your plumbing system.

If not cared for properly, obstructions in your sewer lines and drains can create problems that require professional attention.

Green Apple Plumbing offers reliable drain and sewer service to clear obstructions, repair issues, and keep your system healthy.

More than just water passes through the drains in your home.

Debris such as food particles, grease, hair, soap residue, and more rinse down your drains.

While your drains are designed to handle small amounts of these debris, too much can cause obstructions.

A tell-tale sign of an obstructed drain is poor drainage.

Green Apple Plumbing offers drain cleaning service to free your drains of clogs.

We can also help you combat clogs by installing drain traps, which prevent large debris from passing into your sewer lines.

Preventing clogs in your drains will help you protect your home’s sewer lines.

Clogs in your home’s sewer lines cause major inconveniences, affecting usage of your home’s plumbing system and more.

When your sewer lines are clogged, waste cannot properly flow out your home to your septic tank or municipal sewer line.

If you have a clog in your sewer line, you may notice poor drainage and sewage smells.

Other issues affecting sewer lines include root penetrations and collapsed piping.

If you suspect issues with your home’s sewer lines, call Green Apple Plumbing right away.

We perform a thorough inspection of your home’s sewer lines to diagnose the issues at hand, and provide reliable solutions to restore proper function.

Request Service Today!

Plumbing

Green Apple provides inspection services to pinpoint obstructions and other problems which can cause you trouble and lead to extensive repair or replacement needs if ignored.

Services We Offer

New Installations and Replacements

Typical Installations Include:

  • Showers, bathtubs and toilets
  • Kitchen, bath and laundry sinks
  • Faucets and toilets
  • Water heaters, gas, electric, oil, solar
  • Tankless water heaters
  • Handicapped fixtures and accessories
  • Replacement of galvanized drain and water lines
  • Sump pumps
  • Garbage disposals
  • Bathroom remodeling
  • New homes
  • Additions
  • Well pumps
  • Replacement of cast-iron drains
  • Back-flow preventers
  • Outdoor spigots
  • Sewer, water and drain line repair and replacement
  • Water meters

Looking to update your bathroom to create an elegant bath retreat, tired of soaking up water in your basement and need a new sump pump installed, you've heard about tankless water heaters and want to learn more? We can help!

For years Green Apple Mechanical has been providing expert advice, design, and installations built to meet your needs. Our professional estimators take the time to listen to you and evaluate your home before providing a detailed proposal, often suggesting several alternatives that will deliver the comfort your family deserves while maximizing your budget.

We are committed to plumbing excellence in each and every job we perform.

Request Service Today!

Sewer/Drain Services

The sewer lines and drains in your New Jersey are essential components of your plumbing system.

If not cared for properly, obstructions in your sewer lines and drains can create problems that require professional attention.

Green Apple Plumbing offers reliable drain and sewer service to clear obstructions, repair issues, and keep your system healthy.

More than just water passes through the drains in your home.

Debris such as food particles, grease, hair, soap residue, and more rinse down your drains.

While your drains are designed to handle small amounts of these debris, too much can cause obstructions.

A tell-tale sign of an obstructed drain is poor drainage.

Green Apple Plumbing offers drain cleaning service to free your drains of clogs.

We can also help you combat clogs by installing drain traps, which prevent large debris from passing into your sewer lines.

Preventing clogs in your drains will help you protect your home’s sewer lines.

Clogs in your home’s sewer lines cause major inconveniences, affecting usage of your home’s plumbing system and more.

When your sewer lines are clogged, waste cannot properly flow out your home to your septic tank or municipal sewer line.

If you have a clog in your sewer line, you may notice poor drainage and sewage smells.

Other issues affecting sewer lines include root penetrations and collapsed piping.

If you suspect issues with your home’s sewer lines, call Green Apple Plumbing right away.

We perform a thorough inspection of your home’s sewer lines to diagnose the issues at hand, and provide reliable solutions to restore proper function.

Request Service Today!

Plumbing

Green Apple provides inspection services to pinpoint obstructions and other problems which can cause you trouble and lead to extensive repair or replacement needs if ignored.

Water Heater

The water coming into your home makes a journey through a system of pipes, and it's usually cold or cool, depending on the time of year. To have water warm enough to take a hot shower or bath, or use your dishwasher or washing machine, you need a water heater.

Water heaters are familiar fixtures in most homes. They typically look like big metal cylinders, tall drums that are often consigned to a laundry room or basement.

Newer styles have some interesting features, like losing the tank completely in favor of water-on-demand, but the old, reliable water heater design that's most widely used in the U.S. today is really a pretty simple appliance; it's basically a drum filled with water and equipped with a heating mechanism on the bottom or inside.

Even though they lack drama and complexity, water heaters are still pretty amazing. What makes them interesting is that they exploit the heat rising principle to deliver hot water right to your faucet with a minimum of fuss.

Don't let the simple shape shrouded in its wooly insulating blanket fool you. Water heaters have an ingenious design on the inside for something that looks so ordinary on the outside.

Let's take a quick look at the components that work together in your water heater to make your morning shower so satisfying:

  • Tank - The inner shell of a water heater is a heavy metal tank containing a water protective liner that holds 40 to 60 gallons (151 to 227 liters) of hot water at around 50 to 100 pounds per square inch (PSI), within the pressure range of a typical residential water system. The exterior of the tank is covered in an insulating material like polyurethane foam. Over that, there's a decorative outer shell and possibly an additional insulating blanket.
  • Dip tube - Water enters the water heater through the dip tube at the top of the tank and travels to the tank bottom where it's then heated.
  • Shut-off valve -The shut-off valve stops water flow into the water heater. It's a separate component from the heater located outside and above the unit.
  • Heat-out pipe -Suspended toward the top of the tank's interior, the heat-out pipe allows the hot water to exit the water heater.
  • Thermostat - This is a thermometer- and temperature-control device. Some electric water heaters have a separate thermostat for each element.
  • Heating mechanism - Electric water heaters have heating elements inside the tank to heat the water. Gas water heaters use a burner and chimney system instead.
  • Drain valve - Located near the bottom of the exterior housing, the drain valve makes it easy to empty the tank to replace the elements, remove sediment or move the tank to another location.
  • Pressure relief valve - This safety device keeps the pressure inside the water heater within safe limits.
  • Sacrificial anode rod - Made of magnesium or aluminum with a steel core, the sacrificial anode rod is suspended in the water heater tank to help retard corrosion.

Let's take a close-up look at what's going on inside a water heater's tank to see how simply and elegantly it does its job.

A water heater's thermostat controls the temperature of the water inside the tank. Normally, you can set the temperature anywhere between 120 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit (49 to 82 degrees Celsius). The water temperature setting recommended by most manufacturers is between 120 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit (49 to 60 degrees Celsius). This is hot enough to be efficient for household use, but not so hot that it can pose a scalding risk. If there are children living in your home, it's wise to stay closer to the lower end of the range.

Setting your water heater to a lower temperature saves energy, too, and if you remember to dial back the heat when you go on vacation, you'll experience even more energy savings. Usually, the thermostat is located underneath a protective cover plate and has a knob or dial you can turn to set the temperature.

The dip tube feeds cold water from your home's water lines to the bottom of the tank's interior, where the water starts to warm up. The heating mechanism, either a burner or an element, stays on until the water reaches temperature. As the water heats, it rises to the top of the tank. The heat-out pipe is located near the top of the tank. Water exiting the water heater at the top is always the hottest in the tank at any given moment because it's the nature of hot water to rise above denser, cold water.

The secret to a water heater's design for separating cold, incoming water from hot, outgoing water is that it relies on the principle that heat rises to do the hard part. The position of the heat-out pipe at the top of the tank does the rest.

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Sump Pump

sump pump is a small pump installed in the lowest part of a basement or crawlspace. Its job is to help keep the area under the building dry and to prevent it from flood­ing. Usually, sump pumps are installed in specially constructed sump pits. Water flows into the sump pit through drains or by natural water migration through the soil. The sump pump's job is to pump the water out of the pit and away from the building so the basement or crawlspace stays dry.

According to the American Society of Home Inspectors, more than 60 percent of American homes suffer from below-ground wetness. But even more, homeowners are likely to have to deal with a flooded basement at some point. It doesn't take much water to cause thousands of dollars of damage. A moist basement can also lead to mold and mildew growth, bringing with it all its related health and breathing hazards.

Sump pumps have been a common fixture in some homes for years, primarily in low-lying areas or places where r­apid melting of heavy snow can lead to flooded basements. However, legislation, including amendments to the U.S. Federal Clean Water Act in 1987, has made sump pumps a requirement in homes that aren't necessarily at a high risk for flooding. Today, sump pumps are common in new construction homes.

A sump pump usually stands in a sump pit -- a hole with a gravel base about 2 feet (60 centimeters) deep and 18 inches (45 centimeters) wide -- dug in the lowest part of your basement or crawlspace. As the pit fills with water, the pump turns on. It moves the liquid out of the pit through pipes that run away from your home to a spot where the water can drain away from your foundation. The pipe usually has a one-way valve called a check valve at the pump end to keep the water from flowing back into the pit.

Most sump pumps turn on automatically through a float activator arm or a pressure sensor. The pressure sensor works just like its name suggests: Water exerts more pressure on the sensor than air does, which causes the pump to activate. The float activator works a lot like the one in your toilet tank. A buoyant ball floats on top of the water, manually moving the arm as the water level rises. You can also buy a manually operated pump, which works only when you decide to turn it on, but these aren't as common because of their lack of convenience. Automatic pumps also have an option for you to activate the pump if the float arm or sensor should fail to work.

The typical home sump pump uses a centrifugal pump to move water. When the motor is on, it causes a screw- or fanlike device called an impeller to turn. Using the centrifugal force, the spinning impeller forces water toward the sides of the pipe, creating a low-pressure area at its center. Water from the pit rushes to fill the void, and the impeller's spinning action pushes it out through the pipe.

Sump pumps for home use are powered by electricity and use standard household current, so they don't require specialized wiring beyond a grounded outlet. Since the pump is always in or near water, it's a good idea to have a ground fault circuit interrupter on the outlet to prevent accidental electrocution.

There are two primary sump pump designs, both of which are about 2 1/2 to 3 feet (76.2 to 91 centimeters) high. A submersible pump rests in the water. It's encased in a waterproof housing, with the pump itself at the bottom and the outlet pipe near the top. A flat-screen or grate covers the bottom of the pump to keep out debris. When the pump turns on, water is sucked up through the grate and routed into the pipes and out of your home.

The other common type of sump pump is the pedestal pump. Pedestal pumps look something like a long stick with a fat head. The pedestal keeps the pump out of the pit, away from the water even when the pit is full. An inlet pipe reaches down into the bottom of the pit to draw the water out. Since the motor and pump are out of the water, pedestal pumps are usually louder -- but less expensive -- than submersible pumps.

Choosing a Sump Pump

Depending on the laws in your area, you may not need a sump pump. For example, if you've never had standing water in your basement and it's consistently warm and dry, a sump pump probably wouldn't do you much good. However, if the area under your house floods occasionally or feels damp and smells musty, there's a good chance y­ou have an issue with moisture entry. Along with other waterproofing steps, a sump pump would make your basement a healthier space and protect any possessions and appliances you store there.

One way you can check whether moisture is getting into your home through your basement floor or walls is by taping a 2-foot-square (61-centimeter-square) piece of plastic onto the surface and leaving it in place for a day or two. If you're not sure where the moisture may be coming in, it's a good idea to do this in multiple spots. After a couple of days, check under the plastic -- if it's wet, you have a moisture problem.

The first step in dealing with basement moisture is to air it out and run a dehumidifier. Since most moisture that ends up in a basement comes from water draining around your foundation, check to see that your gutters and downspouts are in good repair and directing water at least 6 feet (1.8 meters) away from your foundation. In a couple of weeks, repeat your plastic sheet test -- if it shows moisture, a sump pump may be a good idea.

Since sump pumps have many options available, when choosing one, you need to make some decisions:

  • Manual or automatic: Although manually operated sump pumps are available and slightly less expensive, an automatic pump is far more convenient.
  • Horsepower: Sump pumps are commonly one-quarter to one-third horsepower. More powerful motors will pump more water, but you don't need to go overboard if your moisture problem is minor.
  • Head pressure: Head pressure is the height a pump can raise water. For example, a pump with head pressure of 12 feet (3.7 meters) can raise water to that height, minus about 10 percent for physical limitations like bends in pipes. The pump you choose must be able to lift water out of the sump pit and up to the outlet pipe.
  • Cord length: You n­eed to be able to plug a sump pump directly into a ground fault circuit interrupter outlet -- you shouldn't plug one into an extension cord.
  • Voltage: Most sump pumps for use in U.S. homes operate on standard 110-volt circuits. Pumps with 220 or 4690 volts are available but are more commonly used in industrial applications.
  • Backup and alarm systems: Choose the alarm notification and backup system that fits with your personal lifestyle.

Sump Pump Installation

You can have a professional install a sump pump in your home, but if you're a reasonably handy person, it may be a job you can take on yourself. Here's an overview of how to install a sump pit and pump in your basement.

  1. Determine where water, sewer, and utility lines enter your home. You want to put your sump pit away from this ­  existing infrastructure at the lowest point of your basement (you can use a laser level to determine this point). The pump should be at least 8 inches (20 centimeters) away from an outside wall and close to a ground fault circuit interrupter outlet.
  2. Figure out how you are going to route the outlet pipe -- usually 1 1/2 inch to 2 inch (3.8 to 5 centimeter) PVC. Running it up through a rim joist is usually the easiest way to get the pipe to the outside.
  3. Purchase your sump pump and liner together. The liner, essentially a heavy plastic tub with slits to allow water to enter, will determine the size of the hole you dig. You want to dig the hole at least 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) wider than the liner and about 6 inches (15.2 centimeters) deeper. You can use the liner as a starting template and enlarge your outline by 3 inches (7.6 centimeters).
  4. Dig the hole to the depth recommended by the sump pump manufacturer, then level the bottom. The easiest way to cut through the concrete is to use a jackhammer.
  5. Put the liner into the hole and fill around the outside with coarse gravel. Also put about 6 inches (15 centimeters) of gravel in the bottom of the pit. Tamp it down firmly to ensure the bottom stays level.
  6. Attach the discharge pipe to the pump, and place the pump into the pit, making sure it stands upright and level.
  7. Cut a piece of PVC drain pipe 1 foot (30.5 centimeters) long. Drill a hole in the rim joist to accommodate the discharge pipe and install it in the hole.
  8. Measure and cut pieces of PVC pipe to run from the pump to the inside of the pipe through the rim header. Dry fit all the pieces, and when you're sure they are right, cement them together.
  9. On the outside, fit a piece of discharge pipe onto the pipe protruding through the rim header. Run it to the discharge area, then cement the pipe in place. The discharge pipe shoul­d have a small vent hole that's out of the water but drains into the pit. This vent hole is designed to prevent an air lock from forming in the lower part of the pump.
  10. Finish up by caulking around the hole in the rim header both inside and outside and supporting the discharge pipe inside the house by attaching it to walls or joists.
  11. Finally, adjust the float valve on the pump following the manufacturer's directions. Check the operation by pouring in two or three buckets of water, then plug in the pump.

Sump Pump Maintenance

Most sump pumps are equipped with water level or flood alarms, usually, battery powered, that alert you if the pump isn't working properly and water is backing up. More sophisticated systems can notify your alarm company or call your cell phone if the water starts to rise. Fortunately, this shouldn't happen often. Sump pumps, on the whole, are quite reliable. But as with any other important piece of equipment, regular maintenance is always a good idea. Spend a few minutes every couple of months, when heavy rains are forecast and in early spring to ensure reliable sump pump operation. Basic sump pump maintenance is usually as simple as doing these few jobs.

  • Make sure the pump is plugged into a working ground fault circuit interrupter outlet and the cord is in good shape. In damp areas, GFCI ­breakers may trip, effectively shutting off the sump pump. Check in on your sump pump periodically so you can reset the GFCI if necessary.
  • Ensure the pump itself is standing upright. Vibrations during operation can cause it to fall or tilt onto one side. This can jam the float arm so it can't activate the pump.
  • Periodically pour a bucket of water into the pit to make sure the pump starts automatically and the water drains quickly once the pump is on. If the pump doesn't start, have it serviced.
  • Physically remove a submersible pump from the pit and clean the grate on the bottom. The sucking action of the pump can pull small stones into the grate, blocking the inlet or damaging the pump over time.
  • Ensure the outlet pipes are tightly joined together and draining out at least 20 feet (6 meters) away from your foundation.
  • Make sure the vent hole in the discharge pipe is clear.

Another important point is the sump pump's power supply. The fact that sump pumps rely on electricity to operate does make them vulnerable in the event of a power outage. Fortunately, there are backup options available. For some people, at least those on municipal water systems -- and assuming the city water system is still functional -- water-powered sump pumps that don't need any electricity are an option. These pumps literally use the pressure of flowing water to pump water out of the sump. The downside to this design is that the pumping process uses virtually the same amount of city water as the quantity of water it pumps out. So, while water-powered pumps aren't necessarily a good choice for a main pump, they offer a viable option for a short duration backup pump.

Sump pumps with backup battery power are also commonly available. The backup power comes from a car battery -- or even better, a deep cycle boat battery. Most of the systems charge the batteries while the power is on, ensuring the battery is fully charged in the event of a power outage. Alternatively, a trickle charger used for car batteries is also an option.

Some homeowners use backup gasoline or diesel generators to provide their own electricity in the event of a power outage. Since a small sump pump needs 800 to 100 watts to operate and can draw up to 1,800 watts when starting, a backup generator needs to be sized properly and, of course, well maintained.

If all else fails, you can turn to a hand-operated bilge pump or a bucket brigade to move water out of the pit during a power outage.

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What is indoor air quality?

You look to your home for a comfortable, safe haven. However, if your retreat leaves you feeling unwell, you may be suffering from poor indoor air quality.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), indoor air quality refers to the air quality within and around buildings and structures as it relates to the health and comfort of its occupants.

Indoor air quality is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation, and chemical or biological contaminants found within the air inside a building.

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) refers to the air quality within and around buildings and structures, especially as it relates to the health and comfort of building occupants. Understanding and controlling common pollutants indoors can help reduce your risk of indoor health concerns.

Health effects from indoor air pollutants may be experienced soon after exposure or, possibly, years later.

Immediate Effects

Some health effects may show up shortly after a single exposure or repeated exposures to a pollutant. These include irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. Such immediate effects are usually short-term and treatable. Sometimes the treatment is simply eliminating the person's exposure to the source of the pollution, if it can be identified. Soon after exposure to some indoor air pollutants, symptoms of some diseases such as asthma may show up, be aggravated or worsened.

The likelihood of immediate reactions to indoor air pollutants depends on several factors including age and preexisting medical conditions. In some cases, whether a person reacts to a pollutant depends on individual sensitivity, which varies tremendously from person to person. Some people can become sensitized to biological or chemical pollutants after repeated or high level exposures.

Certain immediate effects are similar to those from colds or other viral diseases, so it is often difficult to determine if the symptoms are a result of exposure to indoor air pollution. For this reason, it is important to pay attention to the time and place symptoms occur. If the symptoms fade or go away when a person is away from the area, for example, an effort should be made to identify indoor air sources that may be possible causes. Some effects may be made worse by an inadequate supply of outdoor air coming indoors or from the heating, cooling or humidity conditions prevalent indoors.

Long-Term Effects

Other health effects may show up either years after exposure has occurred or only after long or repeated periods of exposure. These effects, which include some respiratory diseases, heart disease and cancer, can be severely debilitating or fatal. It is prudent to try to improve the indoor air quality in your home even if symptoms are not noticeable.

While pollutants commonly found in indoor air can cause many harmful effects, there is considerable uncertainty about what concentrations or periods of exposure are necessary to produce specific health problems. People also react very differently to exposure to indoor air pollutants. Further research is needed to better understand which health effects occur after exposure to the average pollutant concentrations found in homes and which occurs from the higher concentrations that occur for short periods of time.

Why is indoor air quality important?

Pollutants building up in your home can result not only in unpleasant odors, but also serious health issues such as:

  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Sore eyes
  • Burning nose
  • Worsening of allergies
  • Respiratory issues
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Heart disease
  • Cancer
  • Other serious, long-term conditions
  • Death (carbon monoxide and other pollutants in high concentrations)

What can cause poor indoor air quality?

  • Smoking
  • Indoor pets
  • Pollen
  • Dust mites
  • Radon
  • Inadequate whole-house ventilation
  • Improperly vented combustion appliances and fireplaces (carbon monoxide)
  • Mold and mildew resulting from moisture damage and high humidity
  • VOCs from chemical cleaning products and pesticides
  • Building materials containing asbestos, formaldehyde, and lead
  • High temperature and humidity can also increase the levels of some pollutants

Prevent Poor Indoor Air Quality

Air Duct Cleaning

Your home may look pristine throughout, however pollutants like mold, bacteria, and dust could be hidden within your air ducts, effecting your air quality. The professional technicians at Green Apple Mechanical can inspect your ductwork, cleaning and repairing it as necessary to prevent the contamination of your home.

Air Filters

Changing air filters regularly – at least every two to three months or once a year for box-type filters – improves air quality inside your home, cuts down on energy use, as well as prevents damage and prolongs the life of your heating and cooling system by reducing resistance. Higher efficiency filters can even reduce irritants such as mold spores, pollen, and bacteria. Check with a professional before installing specialty filters, however, as certain filters may be incompatible, causing damage to your system.

Air Purifiers/Electronic Air Cleaners

Air cleaners improve air quality by removing harmful pollutants from the air such as smoke, mold, viruses, and allergens. Whole-house air purifiers are more effective than portable varieties. Whole-house purifiers can be added to your HVAC system and can trap and filter pollutants such as dust, smoke, mold, pet dander, and more. They often include features such as HEPA technology (for improved filtration of the smallest particles), carbon filtration (for gaseous pollutants), and UV light (for disinfection), making them more effective.

Dehumidifiers

High temperature and humidity can increase the levels of indoor pollutants. Controlling mold with a whole-house dehumidifier can help reduce allergy causing mold and mildew. Used in conjunction with your central heating and air, whole-house dehumidifiers remove excess moisture from the air in your home, improving indoor air quality.

Mechanical Ventilation

Air inside your home is two to five times more polluted than the air outside. Bringing fresh air into your home with the help of mechanical ventilation such as window fans, attic fans, and energy efficient heat recovery, whole-house ventilators will not only boost indoor air quality, but also help keep your home more comfortable.

General Vacuuming and Cleaning

Daily vacuuming and dusting can control larger particles, however the smallest particles – the cause of the most irritation – can only be removed with filtering devices.

Improve your indoor air quality and breathe easier. Contact Green Apple Mechanical today. Our professional technicians can help you find the perfect solution for your home’s indoor air quality issues.

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Heating System Maintenance

You can’t neglect your heating system and expect it to stay in good condition. To prevent your furnace from falling into disrepair, hire a professional to perform the following tasks:

  • Change the filter
  • Check airflow and fan controls
  • Lubricate moving parts
  • Check electrical connections
  • Check burners
  • Ensure proper thermostat calibration
  • Inspect safety controls
  • Check the gas line
  • Tighten or replace belts
  • Conduct an amp-draw test
  • Inspect the condensate drain on a condensing furnace
  • Check the heat exchanger for rust, cracks or corrosion

Schedule Annual Heating Repair and Service

The only item above you can accomplish without training is changing the filter. Enjoy the benefits of professional heating repair and service, including maximum performance, efficiency and safety. Don’t worry about forgetting to schedule maintenance next year when you sign up for and Aire Serv® Total Comfort Tune-Up. The Total Comfort Tune-Up from Aire Serv includes a professional cleaning, adjustment and safety check.

Learn What Type of Heating System You Have

An important step to properly caring for your heating equipment is to learn what type you have. Then, you can increase your knowledge of your equipment and perform maintenance specific to your equipment between formal visits from a heating system expert. Rest assured that Aire Serv repairs and services all brands and types of heating systems.

When to Repair or Replace

It’s impossible to keep a furnace running indefinitely. There comes a time in every furnace’s life when it no longer performs at the level you need. When that happens, a replacement makes more sense than a repair. Here’s how to tell if it’s time to replace your furnace:

  • Age: If your furnace is well over a decade old, it could be time to replace it.
  • Repair frequency: Is this the second or third repair this year? Is a looming repair close to half the cost of a new system? Stop throwing away money and put your funds toward a high-efficiency replacement.
  • Energy bills: Rising energy costs could be one reason your heating bills are higher than a few years ago, but it’s also likely due to your aging furnace losing its ability to perform efficiently. A steady increase in energy bills is a sign that your furnace is past its prime.
  • Comfort: Higher energy bills combined with diminished indoor comfort is incredibly frustrating. Uneven temperatures, trouble keeping up with demand, and cold air exiting supply registers are signs of a pending furnace replacement.

Green Apple Mechanical is committed to providing top-quality heating repair and service while maintaining a respectful attitude toward you and your home. Our world-class technicians know how to treat you with respect and courtesy, and we are always available to ensure that you receive help when you need it. We charge by the job, not by the hour, and we promise that you will be satisfied with your furnace repair or we will correct it at no cost to you.

To schedule your heating repair and service with Green Apple Mechanical, contact us today. We’re happy to answer all your questions.

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Heater Repair

Heating equipment is complicated, so when one component malfunctions, it impacts the entire system’s ability to operate. Here are some common reasons to contact Aire Serv for emergency furnace repair:

  • The furnace won’t turn on.
  • The pilot light is out.
  • Strange noises are coming from the furnace during startup or operation.
  • The main burner won’t light or won’t stay lit for longer than three seconds.
  • The blower never turns on after the burners are lit.
  • The furnace blower stays on constantly.

Reasons the Furnace has Stopped Working Properly

It’s easy to notice when the above problems are occurring, but they are merely symptoms of an underlying cause. Here are the top reasons your furnace has stopped working and how Aire Serv technicians repair them:

  • No power to the furnace: If the fan doesn’t respond to raising the thermostat’s temperature, a breaker may have tripped, the wiring could be loose, or the furnace switch might be turned off. More complicated problems include trouble with the transformer, thermostat, control board, run capacitor or blower motor. A technician can perform a diagnostic test to pinpoint the exact problem and come up with a solution.
  • Failing motor: Squeaks and squeals may emanate from a motor that’s about to fail. Immediate attention from a technician is required to save the furnace from a complete breakdown.
  • No ignition: In furnaces with spark ignitions, rapid clicking sounds indicate that the burner is trying to ignite. Failure to do so could be caused by a blocked flue, faulty control board, or improper limit control. Repairing or replacing these parts should remedy the problem.
  • Main burner problems: Burners that won’t stay lit are most commonly caused by a dirty flame sensor or a clogged condensate drain in the case of condensing furnaces. If the burners won’t light at all, the gas supply could be cut off. Cleaning key components and making a few adjustments should be all a technician is required to do for this furnace repair.
  • Issues with the run capacitor or motor: These problems cause the blower not to turn on after the burners ignite.
  • Clogged air filter: Assuming the thermostat isn’t set to “on,” which keeps the blower motor on continuously, a clogged air filter is the primary cause of a blower motor running all the time. The restricted airflow may have damaged the limit switch, which senses the internal furnace temperature. An Aire Serv technician not only replaces the switch; he also pinpoints the problem. If a clogged filter is the cause, he will educate you on changing the air filter and the process for doing so.

Preventive Furnace Maintenance

Aire Serv is available 24/7 to assist you with your emergency furnace repair. By definition emergencies are unexpected and can happen in spite of even the most vigilant upkeep routines, but in reality most homeowners do not include their furnace in their seasonal rituals. Our furnace maintenance information guides you through the things you can do to maintain the health of you furnace.

To schedule emergency furnace repair, please contact the professionals at Green Apple Mechanical today.

Request Service Today!

Heater – Repair or Replace?

Sooner or later, you will need to replace your heater, but is now the right time? Consider these factors when deciding whether to repair or replace your existing equipment.

  • Age: If your furnace or boiler is 12 to 15 years old, it’s probably not worth spending money on a repair. This is particularly true if you have already spent money on a few repairs in the last year or two.
  • Investment cost: Look at the cost of an upcoming repair. If it’s nearly 50 percent of a new heating system’s cost, choosing a replacement is more economical.
  • Utility bills: One promising aspect of replacing your outdated equipment is that you can choose a high-performance system that consumes less energy. Start saving money on utility bills now and enjoy those savings for years to come by replacing your system sooner rather than later.

What Should be Considered When Choosing a Heater Replacement?

  • Geographic location: Furnaces and boilers make the most sense in cold climates while heat pumps could be an energy-saving heater replacement in mild climates. However, keep in mind that all-climate heat pumps are becoming a viable option for residents of colder climates. Your geographic location also affects the efficiency you choose. In short, the more you spend on heating bills, the more worthwhile it is to invest in high-efficiency equipment.
  • Home type and existing system: If you don’t have ductwork, it makes sense to choose a boiler instead of a furnace or heat pump. If your home is ducted, perhaps your air conditioner needs to be replaced soon. You could cut back on your investment by choosing a heat pump instead of a traditional furnace/air conditioner combination.

What Types of Heating Systems are Available?

  • Gas furnaces are the most common type of heating system in the United States thanks to the low cost of operation.
  • Electric furnaces cost more to operate, but they are often the go-to option when natural gas is not available.
  • Oil furnaces require you to store fuel onsite. It’s another viable alternative to a natural gas furnace.
  • Boilers are known for delivering quiet, comfortable heat in homes with no ductwork and are particularly popular for their use in radiant floor systems. Gas, oil and electric models are available.
  • Air-source heat pumps move heat rather than generating it from a combustible fuel source. Thanks to a reversing valve, heat pumps can operate as heating systems as well as air conditioners. They are most efficient in mild climates where the temperature rarely drops below freezing.
  • Geothermal heat pumps are often the most expensive heater replacement to install, but they produce incredibly efficient, environmentally friendly heating by transferring energy from the earth. The same as air-source heat pumps, geothermal systems can both heat and cool your home.

What are the Benefits of an Energy-Efficient Heater Replacement?

  • Energy savings: Consider that heating accounts for upwards of 50 percent of your energy bills this winter. While a more efficient heater requires a higher upfront investment, the resulting energy savings are often well worth it.
  • Improved home comfort: Advanced features that allow a heater replacement to perform more efficiently also make your home more comfortable. Expect fewer drafts and more even temperatures from room to room when you choose an energy-efficient heater.
  • Environmentally friendly: There’s no reason why staying warm this winter should make you feel guilty. Conservative fuel consumption achieved by high-efficiency equipment is a step in the right direction for a cleaner environment without sacrificing home comfort.

What Energy Efficiency Laws Affect the Decision?

The EPA planned to put new furnace efficiency laws into effect on May 1, 2013. The proposed plan involved raising the current minimum Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) from 80 to 90 in the northern United States. However, this plan fell through and the old requirement of 80 AFUE still stands around the country. Minimum boiler efficiency depends on the type of fuel. The minimum AFUE ratings for each type include:

  • 80 AFUE for gas-fired steam boilers
  • 82 AFUE for gas-fired hot water boilers
  • 82 AFUE for oil-fired steam boilers
  • 84 AFUE for oil-fired hot water boiler

To learn more about making an efficient heater replacement, please contact Green Apple Mechanical Heating and Air Conditioning. Our skilled technicians can provide the professional replacement you’re looking for.

Request Service Today!

Furnace Repair or Replace

Your home’s HVAC system is an expensive investment. Perhaps this tempts you to put off a furnace replacement and choose to repair your outdated unit instead. Consider these factors when deciding whether to repair or replace:

  • Age: A 12- to 15-year-old furnace is probably on its last leg and not worth repairing, especially if you have already poured money into several repairs over the past season or two.
  • Investment cost: It costs more to replace than to repair, but consider the long-term investment cost of keeping your old furnace up and running. The knowledgeable HVAC contractors at Aire Serv can help you calculate your return on investment.
  • Utility rates: By taking utility bills from past seasons and calculating future bills based on rising utility rates, you can determine how much it will cost to run your existing furnace this year. Compare that with the energy consumed by a new furnace at the same utility rates and see what savings you can expect from a furnace replacement.

Different Types of Furnaces and Heating Systems

Furnaces are one of the most popular heating systems today:

  • Gas furnaces have low operational costs and are therefore the most common.
  • Electric furnaces are a good alternative where natural gas is not available.
  • Oil furnaces are another choice if natural gas isn’t an option.

Other types of heating systems are also available:

  • Heat pumps work like ACs during the summer and ACs in reverse during the winter.
  • Boilers heat water for radiant heating systems.

What to Consider when Choosing a Furnace Replacement

  • Geographic location: If you rely more on heating than air conditioning because you live in a cold geographic location, it’s worthwhile to invest in a high-efficiency furnace replacement. Paying the extra upfront cost might not be economical for warm-climate residents, though.
  • Existing system: If you’re interested in adding air conditioning, a heat pump might be a better choice than a furnace, depending on your climate. Then again, if your home doesn’t have ductwork, a boiler could prove to be the most economical.

Benefits of an Energy-Efficient Furnace Replacement

  • Energy savings: Upgrading from your mediocre furnace to a high-efficiency model, you can expect immediate and profound savings on your monthly utility bills all season long.
  • Improved home comfort: The features that help an efficient furnace perform better also keeps you more comfortable. Expect more even temperatures from room to room and fewer drafts that diminish your comfort level.
  • Environmentally friendly: Put away your guilt while running your high-efficiency furnace this winter. By keeping your home comfortable with less fuel consumption, an energy-efficient furnace replacement helps conserve fossil fuels. It also gives off fewer emissions that negatively impact the environment.

Energy Efficiency Laws

Perhaps you have heard about the EPA’s plan to implement new furnace efficiency laws. Initially, the EPA planned to require the northern half of the United States to increase the minimum Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) rating from 80 percent to 90 percent on May 1, 2013, while keeping southern states at the previous 80 percent requirement. This plan fell through, however, and all states’ minimum efficiency requirements are still 80 percent AFUE.

To learn more about making an efficient furnace replacement, contact Aire Serv. We’re equipped to provide the professional replacement you’re looking for.

Request Service Today!

AC Installation

In our NJ climate, a high-efficiency central air conditioning system can keep your whole house comfortable while keeping utility costs low. And we know you want your home air conditioning to keep your family cool when the temperature outside creeps up. Our systems are designed to keep you comfortable while saving energy.

Do you want central air conditioning installed in your home? Even if you don’t have ductwork or can’t get ductwork to fit in your home, Air, Inc. can help. We have Ductless air conditioning systems that will cool your home and they are just as efficient as a central air conditioning system (if not more so).

Green Apple Mechanical offers many HVAC financing options so that you can make replacing your heating and/or air conditioning system affordable.

Request Service Today!

AC Maintenance

Taking care of your air conditioner is a very important task, especially since you depend on it to make your home a comfortable place to live. Neglecting your air conditioner can result in it breaking down more easily or running less efficiently, which cause your energy bills to go up.

Maintaining Your Air Conditioner

There are a few things that you can do to ensure that your air conditioner runs as efficiently as possible throughout the year, as well as preventing problems from developing:

  • Check your air filters – You should check the air filter for your air conditioner on a monthly basis. If it is dirty, you should either clean or replace it. Not changing your air filter can result in it becoming clogged, which will not only restrict air flow throughout your home, but will also result in your air conditioner working much harder than it should. This will cause unnecessary wear and tear on the air conditioner as well as increase your energy costs.
  • Clean the equipment – Make sure to clean the individual components of your air conditioner regularly to avoid grime, dirt and other obstructions from decreasing the unit’s efficiency. Be sure to use a shop vacuum to clear the dirt and dust around the air conditioner as well as from your ducts.
  • Keep area around the unit clear – Make sure that nothing is obstructing the exterior part of your air conditioner. You should keep your bushes trimmed back and make sure no other plants or other greenery grows too close.

Annual Professional Inspection

Schedule a maintenance checkup on a yearly basis – ideally before the cooling season begins – in order to make sure it’s working as efficiently as possible. A service such as Aire Serv’s Total Comfort Tune-up will ensure that your air conditioner is in tip-top working shape and that it will last for years to come. Not to mention Aire Serv can fix smaller problems that could potentially grown into larger, much more costly problems in the future.

Knowing What You Have

There are a number of different types of air conditioning units, and the way you maintain it will depend on the type of unit you own. Some of the more common air conditioner units include: split system units, which make use of an indoor and outdoor unit; ductless split systems, which use indoor and outdoor units but without a duct system; and packaged air conditioners, which sit outside. Use our helpful guide to find out which type of air conditioning unit you have.

Repairing or Replacing

An air conditioning unit can be expensive, which means the last thing you want to do is purchase another one. However, sometimes repairing it might not be the best option. An older unit that has undergone multiple repairs should probably just be replaced. Other factors to consider include overall investment costs, long term operating costs and utility rates.

If you need air conditioner repair and service or you want to schedule a tune-up today, then be sure to contact Green Apple Mechanical today!

Request Service Today!

Air Conditioning

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